Review: Broken Fate (Threads of the Moirae Book 1) by Jennifer Derrick @JDerrickAuthor @CleanTeenPub

Ebook - Broken Fate

Blurb

Zeus gave her one simple job: Kill every human. Atropos—daughter of Zeus and the third goddess of Fate from Greek mythology —spends her eternal life snipping human lifelines when their mortal lives are over. As if being a killer doesn’t make life miserable enough, she and her Fate-wielding sisters must live amongst the humans on Earth thanks to a long-running feud between their mother and Zeus. Living on Earth means they must mingle with the mortals, attend the local high school, and attempt to fit in—or at least not stand out too much.
Killing and mingling don’t mix, which is why Atropos’ number-one rule is to avoid all relationships with the humans. Caring for the people she has to kill is a fast track to insanity. However, when Alex Morgan walks into her first-period English class, she knows she’s in for trouble. He’s the worst kind of human for her to like—one with a rapidly approaching expiration date. And he makes Atropos want to break all the rules.

Broken Fate (Threads of the Moirae Book 1)Broken Fate by Jennifer Derrick

Kat’s rating: 5 of 5 stars

Engrossed from the first chapter

This book was just what I needed, with a great storyline, compelling and complex characters. The words flow from the pages, creating a world where the fates are living in our world, going to school while, tending their duty to Zeus.
I’ve always had a penchant for the God’s of Olympus, and I’ll be getting the next book in this series asap.

I loved that the emotional growth Sophie, or Atropos as she was known by the ancient Greeks, as she spent time with Alex.

Alex, his life has been a rough one, but Sophie brings him something to distract him from the problems he can’t run away from.

Their relationship builds slowly, and I loved how he never lost his humour or charm, but will fate give them a happy future?

‘Oft have I heard that grief softens the mind, And makes it fearful and degenerate; Think therefore on revenge and cease to weep.’” – Shakespeare. I think this sums up how I feel, at the end of book 1, and l can’t wait to read book 2.
Highly recommended

View all Kat’s reviews

 

Excerpt

With his ordered world in shambles, Zeus shows up at the cottage on the third day of my strike. The lightning on the window sizzles, and the sound penetrates my nap. I sit up on the sofa and look toward the window

“Are you planning to work, Atropos?” he asks from beyond the lightning curtain.

“Nope,” I say, flopping back on the sofa.

“I can make your punishment more severe,” he says.

“Go ahead,” I say, calling his bluff. “You’ve done the worst you can do. What’s left? Make me push a rock up and down a hill all day, like Sisyphus? Fasten me to a burning wheel for eternity, like Ixion? I’d prefer physical torture to the mental torture I deal with every single day.”

“Oh, please, you foolish girl. The hero act is getting old. I could hurt you. I could make you beg for mercy, and you know it.”

I sit up again and meet his eyes. “You’ve already hurt me. You gave me the job of killing everyone, every day. And worse, I don’t know what I did to make you hate me so much that you had to give me that job. Then, when in the midst of the never-ending misery I find a tiny sliver of happiness, you take it from me and punish me for it. When I finally discover that I can be decent and kind, you do everything you can to make me regret the change.

“So go ahead. Do your worst. I’m already living a nothing life. A little more pain or suffering won’t matter much. As for begging for mercy, you can forget it. I wouldn’t waste my breath.”

Zeus pulls his arm back, and a lightning bolt appears in his hand. This one is larger than the one he conjured in the temple. I think, This is it. He’s finally going to strike me down into nothingness. It will be as if I never existed at all. Strangely, I don’t care. I even feel a little hope. Nothingness might be better than being a monster.

Author Bio

I became a freelance writer through a somewhat circuitous route that involved several different jobs and some random coincidences. I never set out to be a writer, yet here I am. Sometimes Life puts you where you need to be. That’s good because my original plan was to become an astronaut. (I even went to Space Camp as a kid. Three times. Space Camp is an under-appreciated 80’s movie, by the way.) When the Space Shuttle program was scuttled, I was pretty darn grateful that Life had decided I should be a writer.

I freelance in many different niches including technical writing, corporate communications, marketing, personal finance, and the board gaming industry. My latest venture is writing reviews of Euro-style board games, and I’m beginning work on a board game related web comic.

I’m also a novelist. Two books have been published in the Threads of the Moirae series with more on the way. There are other works in progress, as well, including more YA novels (contemporary and fantasy) and a fantasy novel for adults. I also have one short story contest win under my belt. Technically, I started writing fiction at the age of six when my parents bought me a child’s typewriter for Christmas and agreed to pay me a penny per page for any stories I churned out. Naturally, such a loose payment scheme led to much abuse and a lot of bloated and heavily padded stories. I hope I’ve learned to do better.

Website ~ Facebook ~ Twitter 

One part I loved in this book was where Sophie takes Alex as a special trip, and to see that there truly was a place like that was interesting, I spent a while looking at the park here

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